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Rhapsody's ramblings  by Rhapsody

I alone shall lead you

“Bring the horses, we will pass the hills near Eithel Sirion and intercept them.” I know they will regard me as a dissident opposing my father. Knowledge of our enemy is scarce under these starlit skies and I cannot ignore the voices of those birds that speak of evil approaching.

They must think I am mad in my adamant refusal to waste time on a discussion with Atar and will undoubtly see me as an instigator in this divided house. I rather leave now and face a rebuke in the morrow in order to rescue us from a sudden death.


There the armies of Morgoth that had passed south into the Vale of Sirion and beleaguered Círdan in the Havens of the Falas came up to their aid, and were caught in their ruin. For Celegorm, Fëanor's son, having news of them, waylaid them with a part of the Elven-host, and coming down upon them out of the hills near Eithel Sirion drove them into the Fen of Serech.
From The Silmarillion: Chapter 13, The return of the Noldor

This scene has always intrigued me what Celegorm decide if the knowledge of this army would reach him. Why did he gather his own army to waylay and drive these Orcs into the Fen of Serech without his other brothers or his father?

This was drabbled for the Word of the Day-drabble project of the Silmarillion Writers Guild where we attempt at writing a drabble or other short fiction every day, based on the Dictionary.com Word of the Day.

The word on the 27th of June 2007:

factious FAK-shuhs, adjective:

1. Given to faction; addicted to form parties and raise dissensions, in opposition to government or the common good; turbulent; seditious; prone to clamor against public measures or men; -- said of persons.

2. Pertaining to faction; proceeding from faction; indicating, or characterized by, faction; -- said of acts or expressions; as, factious quarrels.

Factious derives from Latin factiosus, from factio, a party, a group of people, especially a political party, faction, or side.





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